Judiciary faces challenge of restoring trust amid rise in court rvasion

Judiciary faces challenge of restoring trust amid rise in court rvasion
Caption not available

JUSTICE | Legal experts are urging the Judiciary to find ways to restore public trust in court processes to combat a growing trend of court evasion.

This call to action follows the 2023 Police Crime Report, which revealed that only 10 percent of complainants seek justice through the courts, while the majority turn to alternative, often unlawful, means such as mob justice, social media, and mainstream media.

During the Judiciary's Open Court Day, Deputy Chief Justice Richard Buteera contested the police report's findings, citing an increase in court usage.

"There is an increased use of the court system by the population in the country. For example, during the year 2022, the judiciary registered 239,598 cases, and in 2023, case registration stood at 274,792, which indicates that the public is using courts more," Buteera stated.

However, legal experts argue that these statistics do not reflect the underlying issues causing court evasion.

Lawyer George Musisi explained that the Judiciary must address perceived and actual corruption, as well as the frequent delays in court proceedings, particularly in land dispute cases.

"The slow pace of justice and corruption allegations are driving people away from the courts," Musisi noted.

Another significant issue is the cost associated with seeking justice through the courts. Lawyer Ivan Bwoowe pointed out that many people find court processes expensive and complicated, leading them to seek alternative solutions.

"Affordable court expenses and a more straightforward legal process are essential to bring people back to the courts," Bwoowe said.

Experts suggest that the Judiciary should engage in public education campaigns to help the public understand the role of courts and the importance of following legal channels for resolving disputes.

The aim is to encourage more people to use the legal system rather than resorting to unlawful methods.

The growing trend of court evasion has serious implications for the rule of law and social order.

With the majority of complainants turning to other means, the risk of violence and injustice increases.

The experts believe that addressing these challenges is crucial to maintaining a stable and fair justice system in Uganda.

While the Judiciary's Deputy Chief Justice argues that court usage is increasing, the data from the police crime report and the experiences shared by legal experts suggest that significant work remains to be done to rebuild public trust in the court system.

Without effective action, the trend toward alternative forms of dispute resolution could undermine the very foundations of the legal system.

Reader's Comments

LATEST STORIES

Illiteracy hinders agricultural growth in Uganda: report
agriculture By Ramson Muhairwe
2 hours ago
Illiteracy hinders agricultural growth in Uganda: report
Miss Tourism unveils new regional leaders
tourism By Samuel Muhimba
2 hours ago
Miss Tourism unveils new regional leaders
Man named Christmas fatally shot in Kabale bar scuffle
uncategorized By Lukia Nantaba
2 hours ago
Man named Christmas fatally shot in Kabale bar scuffle
Molly Katanga bail rejection bad for Judiciary
top-stories By Nile Post Editor
2 hours ago
Molly Katanga bail rejection bad for Judiciary
BREAKING: MPs move to censure Mpuuga, commissioners
top-stories By Moses Namayo
3 hours ago
BREAKING: MPs move to censure Mpuuga, commissioners