Uganda Fights Back Against High Teenage Pregnancy Rates

Uganda Fights Back Against High Teenage Pregnancy Rates
Pregnancy

Uganda faces a critical public health challenge: a sky-high teenage pregnancy rate. With 25% of girls pregnant by 19, the country ranks poorly in Sub-Saharan Africa. These pregnancies pose serious health risks and limit opportunities for young mothers.

Poverty, lack of sex education, and a healthcare system that feels inaccessible to teenagers all contribute to the crisis. The Bukedi subregion has the highest rates, followed by Busoga, Tooro, and Lango.

The Ugandan government is taking action. The Ministries of Health and Education are working together to strengthen school health programs through the "School Health Standards and Guidelines." This initiative equips schools to address adolescent health issues directly.

Another promising approach comes from a pilot program by Global Affairs Canada in Bushenyi and Rubirizi districts. This program trains healthcare workers and school personnel to provide crucial counseling services to teenagers.

The success of the Bushenyi program has stakeholders urging the Canadian government to expand it nationwide. By combining this program with the government's ongoing efforts, Uganda can empower young people with knowledge and support, paving the way for a healthier future for its adolescent population.

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