Paris agreement integrity at risk as COP29 nears

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Paris agreement integrity at risk as COP29 nears
Climate change activist Vanessa Nakate

A successful COP29 hinges on reaching a new and ambitious climate finance agreement that satisfies the demands of developing countries.

The fight against climate change faces a significant hurdle as developing nations warn they will not submit more ambitious climate targets for 2035 unless they receive substantial financial support from wealthier countries.

This lack of new commitments threatens to undermine the effectiveness of the Paris Agreement, the landmark international treaty aiming to limit global warming.

According to experts, the current target of mobilising $100 billion annually in climate finance by 2025 is insufficient and yet to be actualized.

Developing countries are now demanding a new, more ambitious long-term funding goal to support their transition to clean energy and adapt to the devastating impacts of climate change mostly caused by the global north.

The Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), a group of developing island nations particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels, further highlighted the need for financial resources to address "loss and damage," the irreversible consequences of climate change like extreme weather events.

The pressure is mounting on developed nations to step up their financial commitments ahead of the upcoming Conference of the Parties (COP29) climate change conference expected to take place later this year.

A successful COP29 hinges on reaching a new and ambitious climate finance agreement that satisfies the demands of developing countries.

Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) like the World Bank and IMF play a crucial role in channeling climate finance to developing nations.

However, their current lending capacity is limited. Experts believe reforms within these institutions could unlock additional resources.

The potential consequences of failing to reach a new agreement at COP29 are dire. Without adequate financial support, developing countries are unlikely to submit more ambitious climate targets, hindering global efforts to keep temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius, a critical threshold to avoid catastrophic climate change.

The upcoming months will be crucial for international cooperation with developed nations having to address the concerns raised by developing countries and working towards a new climate finance agreement that is both equitable and ambitious.

Only then can the world stay on track to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement and ensure a sustainable future for all.

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