NAM at 63: A closer look at its impact and controversies

NAM at 63: A closer look at its impact and controversies
Ndebesa Mwambutsya

As the Non-Aligned Movement marks its 63rd year, analysts are divided on its historical significance, with some downplaying its role in shaping the global agenda.

While acknowledging the movement's early successes in decolonization and the formation of independent states, critics argue that its impact has waned in recent decades.

The NAM was established in 1961 during a pivotal moment in global geopolitics.

Spearheaded by influential leaders such as Josip Broz Tito, Gamal Abdel Nasser, Jawaharlal Nehru, Kwame Nkrumah, and Sukarno, the movement emerged as a response to the Cold War's bipolarization.

Its first official summit, known as the Non-Aligned Conference, took place in 1961, setting the stage for a diplomatic balancing act amid the escalating tensions of the era.

Analyst Ndebesa Mwambutsya emphasizes the historical context,

"The movement originated in the aftermath of the Korean War as an effort by some countries to counterbalance the rapid bi-polarization of the world during the Cold War." he stated

Despite the early successes in the first three decades, skepticism surrounds the contemporary relevance of NAM's principles.

Uganda, for instance, joined the movement in 1964, guided by the Five Principles agreed upon at the Bandung Conference in 1955.

The principles include mutual respect for territorial integrity, mutual non-aggression, mutual non-interference in domestic affairs, equality and mutual benefit, and peaceful co-existence.

State Minister Godfrey Kabbyanga comments on the ongoing debate, stating,

"Six decades later, the fruits of NAM in shaping the interests of the developing world remain skeptical, raising questions on whether the masses understand the phenomena in the first place."

Kabbyanga adds,"On the principle of peaceful co-existence, analysts and political players contend that NAM’s contribution is a double-edged sword."

However, critics emphasize NAM's perceived shortcomings in addressing global power imbalances.

Kabbyanga states,"Critics also underscore NAM’s capacity in failing to address the political, economic and technological hegemony of the global north."

Amidst the debate, some argue that developing countries have successfully amplified their voices on the global stage through NAM. Wanda notes,

"Nonetheless, critics contend that to some extent developing countries have successfully pushed for their voices to count on the global scale."

As Uganda prepares to host the NAM Summit from January 15-20, followed by the G-77 from January 20-23 at Speke Resort Munyonyo in Kampala, the global community watches closely, questioning the movement's role in an ever-evolving geopolitical landscape.

Reader's Comments

RELATED ARTICLES

LATEST STORIES

Bukomansimbi residents sleep outdoors to safeguard 'lucrative' coffee
top-stories By Zainab Namusaazi Ssengendo
40 minutes ago
Bukomansimbi residents sleep outdoors to safeguard 'lucrative' coffee
Surge in street children numbers raise concerns for Masaka City
top-stories By Zainab Namusaazi Ssengendo
3 hours ago
Surge in street children numbers raise concerns for Masaka City
Schools in Gulu City  report 398 red eye cases
health By Joseph Omagor
4 hours ago
Schools in Gulu City report 398 red eye cases
Gen Muhoozi addresses troop promotions, military strategy
news By BillClinton Nuwahereza
4 hours ago
Gen Muhoozi addresses troop promotions, military strategy